Sunday, November 13, 2005

Ridicules Propaganda about Kosovo

Here is an outrages fabrication of news by someone trying to link Kosovo to Middle East. The web site claims that Tehran is somehow trying to stir chaos in Kosovo to deflect West’s attention from its own problems.

As you can see below, the author starts the article by reporting legitimate news (Original article below written by AP) and then out of blue brings in Tehran’s Involvement. This must be one of the most outlandish and poorly constructed lies I ever seen on Internet. Incidentally the website has a link that directs you to a Serbian propaganda mouthpiece, Serbiana.com. I was unable to find this article on the Serbiana website however.

This outrages fabrication was published on the following website:

http://www.crossfirewar.com
Based in Flossmoor,IL 60422.
ph:708-957-9651/fax:708-798-2929.
e-mail:III82100@aol.com
which claims to have been reporting since 1994 about regions involved in WWIII. Yes WWIII! Here is the "article":

Kosovo - Kacanik - Macedonian Border
Night Watch: KACANIK - Serbia-Montenegro authorities in Kosovo have stated that reports have reached them of a group of masked armed men in southern Kosovo, not far from the Macedonian border, have set up check points in Kacanik and are stopping cars.
The area is patrolled by U. S. peacekeepers. The area is only 60 km (40 m) from Pristina. Teheran is preparing to use the area as another flashpoint to deflect the West’s attention away from the Middle East.


Like I said above, the first pat of the article, if it can be called an article, was taken from an AP:

Armed, masked men stop cars in southern Kosovo
Released : Nov 09, 2005 10:01 AM
PRISTINA, Serbia-Montenegro-Authorities in Kosovo said Wednesday they were investigating reports of the appearance of armed groups in the southern part of the U.N.-administered province.

Police received information that men wearing masks and carrying weapons were stopping cars and setting up checkpoints in the area of Kacanik, to the province's south which borders Macedonia, said Neeraj Singh, a U.N. spokesman in Kosovo.

The area, some 60 kilometers (40 miles) from Kosovo's capital, Pristina, is patrolled by U.S. peacekeepers who hold the command in southeastern Kosovo.

If the groups are spotted by NATO peacekeepers, they will be detained, disarmed and handed over to the local police, said Maj. Michael Wunn, the spokesman for U.S. troops.

In a similar case last month, NATO-led peacekeepers said armed men were stopping cars and halting traffic in western Kosovo. The force branded the group, calling itself "Kosovo Independence Army", as "criminals" and increased the number of patrols and checkpoints in that area.

The group stopped vehicles and handed occupants leaflets in which they issued warnings to U.N. and local officials.

The shadow group, which has sent several statements to local media, has threatened U.N. and Kosovo officials with death if they stand in the way of the province's independence.

The appearance of armed extremist groups at a time when this disputed U.N.-run province nears talks on its future is a worrying sign for security officials in Kosovo. There are fears of possible violence from extremists who could try to disrupt the U.N.-sponsored talks later this month that will consider whether Kosovo will become independent or remain part of Serbia.

Kosovo has been administered by the United Nations and patrolled by NATO-led peacekeepers since 1999.

Kosovo's ethnic Albanians want full independence while Serbia insists it retains some authority over the province.

Some 17,500 NATO-led peacekeepers patrol the province. The alliance recently conducted a military exercise to test its readiness to confront possible unrest around the start of negotiations.
Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

No comments: